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Earned Bachelor Degree from the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (Class of 2013) Major: Political Science Minor: Sociology ------------------- I am your typical nerd/geek/otaku. I like to ride my bike, read, write, and surf the internet. Otaku(noun)(おたく/オタク)- is a Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests, particularly anime, manga, and/or video games.

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Wednesday, April 18, 2012

The City of God by Saint Augustine -- Foundations of Political Thought -- Blog Post #4

Textbook: The City of God by Saint Augustine (Translated by Marcus Dods, D.D.)
Blog Started 8:13p.m. April 19, 2012
Required Reading: Book IV, 3-4, 15; Book V:8-22, 26 (pp.223-24 only); Book VI: Preface

In this passage, Saint Augustine discusses matters regarding free will and the role that it plays in relation to fate. He vehemently opposes Cicero's belief that one (whether it be man or God) can not have knowledge of future events and that if there is fate or pre-destiny, then free will cannot exist as it has already been determined what shall come to pass. (The City of God by Saint Augustine pg. 137; Book V: pg 9). Augustine argues that if there is no such thing as freedom of will, then laws are made in vain as there is no suitable punishment for the wicked and no suitable reward for the just man. Augustine states that for the religious man, there is both free will AND pre-destiny. I agree with the concept, but it is difficult to see Augustine's reasoning behind his argument as it takes a sort of small leap of faith in order to acknowledge the omnipotence and omniscience of God. It is also difficult to defend because one does not know the future events beforehand and thus the feeling of not being in control of one's own destiny becomes foreboding (for those that feel as that there is no free will because if free will exists, then the foreknowledge of God is susceptible to change or worse, non-existent thereby nullifying the status of God).

1 comment:

  1. David,

    Good summary, but your critique needed more clarity and focus.

    3

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